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Corruption: Zim Govt Won’t Assist Resettled Farmers Anymore, Says Minister

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Zim Economic Crisis: Nationwide Protests Planned Against 'Illegal' 2% Tax

Zimbabwe’s minister of finance Mthuli Ncube has reportedly said that resettled farmers will no longer get assistance from government, as the programme was “riddled with corruption”.

According to Daily News, Ncube’s decision came after the dramatic failure of the Farm Mechanisation Scheme that was introduced by former president Robert Mugabe’s government in 2007.

The report said that more than $200 million that was pumped into the four-phase programme “did not produce any results”.

A number of unnamed political elites were said to have given themselves irrigation equipment, brand new tractors, combine harvesters and other farming materials.

The loans were never paid back, forcing lawmakers to recommend that they be written off.

Ncube, who is driving an economic reform agenda said the government, did not want to continue supporting the farmers, adding that they should find alternative assistance.

“Movement towards a market-based supply and demand driven approach would be more efficient and sustainable, and also reducing the greater burden of reliance on the fiscus,” Ncube was quoted as saying.

Food security

This came a few weeks after Vice President Constantino Chiwenga said Zimbabwe had “immense potential to become Africa’s breadbasket”.

Sunday News quoted Chiwenga as saying that if farmers embraced government policies, particularly the Command Agriculture “and maximise on the use of local resources”, Zimbabwe would regain its status as the continent’s breadbasket.

He challenged farmers to “produce for export and contribute towards the 2030 vision for an upper middle class economy”.

Chiwenga’s sentiments followed President Emmerson Mnangagwa’s remarks in May where he expressed confidence that the country had ended hunger through the introduction of the Command Agriculture programme.

“As the country continued to face persistent years of drought, we sat as government and said we are a blessed country tucked between Zambezi and Limpopo river so why droughts? We then thought of command agriculture and… the country is doing well in food security,” Mnangagwa was quoted as saying by the Herald.

The main aim for the Command Agriculture programme was to ensure self-food sustenance after which exports would follow to help the country earn the much needed foreign currency.

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African News

Al-Shabaab Executes 3 Men In Somalia

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Al-Shabaab Executes 3 Men In Somalia

Somalia’s militant Islamist group al-Shabaab has killed three men execution-style, accusing two of them of working for the army. The third man it killed was an elderly clan leader who helped choose candidates for the 2016 parliamentary elections.

Media linked to al-Shabaab reported the killings took place in front of a crowd in Mubarak village in southern Somalia.

The militants, who are affiliated to al-Qaeda, control much territory in rural areas of Somalia and are fighting to overthrow the un-backed government.

The militants are known for killing suspected informants, including those accused of spying for the U.S. And other foreign intelligence agencies.

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African News

Kenya Drops Plans To Introduce Controversial New School Syllabus

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Kenya Drops Plans To Introduce Controversial New School Syllabus

Kenya’s education minister Amina Mohamed says the government has dropped plans to introduce a controversial new school syllabus at the start of the academic year in January because it is not ready to roll it out.

The syllabus has caused huge debate in Kenya as it makes radical changes, moving away from an exam-focused to a competency-focused system, which the government says will improve the chances of building successful careers.

The minister added the government still needed to train teachers, and the earliest it would be able to roll out the syllabus would be in 2023.

She said it would be a bad idea to roll out something with which the government is not at all comfortable.  The minister said the government also takes parents into consideration.

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Tanzania’s President Signs Agreement For The Construction Of Controversial Hydro-Electric Power Project

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Tanzania's President Signs Agreement For The Construction Of Controversial Hydro-Electric Power Project

Tanzania’s president John Magufuli has signed an agreement for the construction of a controversial hydro-electric power project in one of East Africa’s best-known game reserves.

The power plant on the Rufiji River in the Selous game reserve is to be built by two Egyptian firms at a cost of more than three billion dollars.

The project has been strongly opposed by conservationists who warn it would cause irreversible damage to the wildlife habitat, and impact the lives of about 200,000 people who depend on the environment.

The Selous game reserve is a UNESCO world heritage site and is home to a vast array of wildlife.

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