Trump Expects Kim Summit Early Next Year Despite Pompeo Postponement – African News Network | ANN | News TV | Latest African News
Connect with us

World News

Trump Expects Kim Summit Early Next Year Despite Pompeo Postponement

Published

on

Trump Expects Kim Summit Early Next Year Despite Pompeo Postponement

President Donald Trump said on Wednesday he expects to meet again with North Korea’s leader Kim Jong Un early next year and that a meeting between U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo and North Korean officials supposed to have taken place this week would be rescheduled.

Pompeo had been due to hold talks in New York on Thursday with senior North Korean official Kim Yong Chol aimed at paving the way for a second summit between Trump and Kim Jong Un and at making progress on denuclearization.

The State Department said early on Wednesday that the meeting had been postponed, but gave no reason, raising concerns that talks aimed at persuading North Korea to give up its nuclear arms could break down. The State Department said the talks would be rescheduled “when our respective schedules permit.”

Trump told a White House news conference the change was “because of trips that are being made,” but did not elaborate on these.”We are going to make it … another day,” he said. “But we’re very happy with how it’s going with North Korea. We think it’s going fine. We’re in no rush.”

Trump said he still expected to hold a second summit with Kim. “Some time next year, I would say. Sometime early next year,” he said.

Kim pledged to work toward denuclearization at an unprecedented first meeting with Trump in Singapore but negotiations have made little headway since, with North Korea falling short of U.S. demands for irreversible moves to abandon a weapons program that potentially threatens the United States.

Pyongyang has complained that Washington has not made concessions in return for the moves it has taken and last Friday warned it could resume development of its nuclear program if the United States did not drop its sanctions campaign.

The Trump administration has said that sanctions will not be lifted until North Korea gives up its weapons.

“The sanctions are on. … I’d love to take the sanctions off, but they (North Korea) have to be responsive, too,” Trump said on Wednesday.

The State Department said “conversations continue to take place,” with North Korea, and added: “The United States remains focused on fulfilling the commitments agreed to by President Trump and Chairman Kim at the Singapore summit in June.”

South Korea, which has worked to encourage U.S.-North Korea dialogue, sought to play down the talks delay.

South Korean foreign minister Kang Kyung-wha said on Thursday the North had suggested a postponement. “The North side said ‘both of our schedules are busy, so let’s postpone,’” Kang said, according what she was told by the United States.

Presidential spokesman Kim Eui-kyeom said Seoul did not believe it would mean that the second summit would not take place and a senior South Korean foreign ministry official said that while the rescheduling was regrettable, there was no need to “overthink the postponement”.

“I think we have to look at it as a part of the process of reaching complete denuclearization and setting up a peace regime,” the unnamed official told reporters.

Trump spoke after his Republican Party lost control of the U.S. House of Representatives on Tuesday after the Democrats rode a wave of dissatisfaction with his presidency in mid-term elections.

Some analysts believe this weakened state could impact Trump’s foreign policy and test his North Korean diplomatic gambit.

While Republicans maintained control of the Senate, the Democrats now have the opportunity to block Trump’s agenda and open his administration to intense scrutiny.

Democrats have said they are determined to obtain more information about meetings between Trump and Pompeo and Kim, worried that Trump is so eager to make a “great deal” that he will give Kim too much with little in return.

North Korea has for years pursued nuclear and missile programs in defiance of U.N. Security Council resolutions but the bellicose rhetoric from both Pyongyang and Trump that raised fears of war has eased this year.

Continue Reading
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

World News

US Federal Court Document Shows Indictment Against Wikileaks Founder Assange

Published

on

By

US Federal Court Document Shows Indictment Against Wikileaks Founder Assange

A US federal court document showed on Thursday that prosecutors have obtained a sealed indictment against Wikileaks founder Julian Assange, whose website published thousands of classified U.S. government documents.

The document, which prosecutors say was filed by mistake, asks a judge to seal documents in a criminal case unrelated to Assange, and carries markings indicating it was originally filed in U.S. District Court in Alexandria, Virginia in August.

A source familiar with the matter said the document was initially sealed but unsealed this week for reasons that are unclear at the moment.

On social network Twitter, Wikileaks said it was an “apparent cut-and-paste error.”

U.S. officials had no comment on the disclosure in the document about a sealed indictment of Assange, the charges facing whom are unclear.

The document is part of an unrelated criminal case involving a 29-year-old man charged with enticing a 15-year-old girl. In that case, the judge wrote in a detention memo that the defendant, Seitu Sulayman Kokayi, “has had a substantial interest in terrorist acts.”

Reuters was unable to immediately trace contact details for Kokayi.

But Joshua Stueve, a spokesman for the prosecutors’ office which filed the document that was unsealed, told Reuters, “The court filing was made in error. That was not the intended name for this filing.”

Reuters was unable to immediately reach Assange or his lawyers to seek comment.

Prosecutors sought to keep the charges confidential until after Assange’s arrest, the document shows, saying the move was essential to ensure he did not evade or avoid arrest and extradition in the case.

Any procedure “short of sealing will not adequately protect the needs of law enforcement at this time because, due to the sophistication of the defendant, and the publicity surrounding the case, no other procedure is likely to keep confidential the fact that Assange has been charged,” the document reads.

It adds, “The complaint, supporting affidavit, and arrest warrant, as well as this motion and the proposed order, would need to remain sealed until Assange is arrested in connection with the charges in the criminal complaint and can therefore no longer evade or avoid arrest and extradition in this matter.”

U.S. officials have previously acknowledged that federal prosecutors based in Alexandria have been conducting a lengthy criminal investigation into WikiLeaks and its founder.

Representatives of the U.S. administration of President Donald Trump, including Secretary of State Mike Pompeo, have publicly called for Assange to be aggressively prosecuted.

Assange and his supporters have periodically said U.S. authorities had filed secret criminal charges against him, an assertion against which some U.S. officials pushed back until recently.

Facing extradition from Britain to Sweden to be questioned in a sexual molestation case, Assange six years ago took refuge in Ecuador’s London embassy, where initially he was treated as a welcome guest.

But following a change in the government of the south American nation, Ecuadorean authorities last March began to crack down on his access to outsiders and for a time cut off his internet access.

Continue Reading

World News

UK PM Theresa May In Biggest Crisis Of Premiership Over Brexit Deal

Published

on

By

UK PM Theresa May In Biggest Crisis Of Premiership Over Brexit Deal

Prime Minister Theresa May was grappling with the biggest crisis of her premiership on Friday after a draft divorce deal with the European Union provoked the resignations of senior ministers and mutiny in her party.

More than two years since the United Kingdom voted to leave the EU in a shock referendum, it is still unclear how, on what terms or even if it will leave the EU as planned on March 29, 2019.

Ever since winning the top job in the turmoil that followed the 2016 referendum, May has sought to negotiate a Brexit deal that ensures that the United Kingdom leaves in the smoothest way possible.

But Brexit minister Dominic Raab resigned over her deal, sending the pound tumbling. Mutinous lawmakers in her own party openly sought to challenge her leadership and bluntly told her that the Brexit deal would not pass parliament.

Asked if she would contest any challenge to her position, May replied: “Am I going to see this through? Yes.” She is due to speak on LBC radio at 0800 GMT.

On Friday, it was not clear whether Michael Gove, the most prominent Brexit-supporting minister in her government, would stay on as environment minister after May offered him the job of Brexit minister, British newspapers reported.

Brexit will pitch the world’s fifth largest economy into the unknown. Many fear it will divide the West as it grapples with both the unconventional U.S. presidency of Donald Trump and growing assertiveness from Russia and China.

Amid the deepest political turmoil since the Suez canal crisis, when in 1956 Britain was forced by the United States to withdraw its troops from Egypt, the ultimate outcome remains uncertain.

Scenarios include May’s deal ultimately winning approval; May losing her job; Britain leaving the bloc with no agreement; or even another referendum.

The EU and Britain need an agreement to keep trade flowing between the world’s biggest trading bloc and the United Kingdom, home to the biggest international financial center.

Supporters of Brexit say that while the divorce might bring some short-term instability, in the longer term it will allow the United Kingdom to thrive and also enable deeper EU integration without such a powerful reluctant member.

By seeking to preserve the closest possible ties with the EU, May has upset her party’s many advocates of a clean break, and Northern Ireland’s Democratic Unionist Party (DUP), which props up her minority government.

Meanwhile, proponents of closer relations with the EU in her own party and the Labour opposition say the deal squanders the advantages of membership for little gain.

The deal will need the backing of about 320 of parliament’s 650 lawmakers to pass.

“It is … mathematically impossible to get this deal through the House of Commons. The stark reality is that it was dead on arrival,” said Conservative Brexit-supporting lawmaker Mark Francois.

Continue Reading

World News

France, U.S Move To Crash Oil Price

Published

on

By

France, U.S Move To Crash Oil Price

France President Emmanuel Macron and U.S. President Donald Trump have agreed to put pressure on oil producers to bring down prices.

Oil prices have risen 45 per cent since Macron took office in mid-2017 and his government is facing pressure on high prices from grassroots movement protesting recent petrol tax hikes.

He said on Wednesday: “When I talked at length with Donald Trump on Saturday in Paris, we together took the decision to put pressure on Saudi Arabia and other producers to limit prices.”

“If you look at prices these last few days, oil prices are starting to fall and I hope that this fall will continue,” he added.

Oil prices rose nearly two per cent on Wednesday, recovering some lost ground the previous day amid signs that OPEC and allied producers may cut output next month to boost prices.

Continue Reading

Trending

Subscribe to ANN News Alert

Be the first to receive the latest news from Africa and around the world.